Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Happy Valentine's Day

My Valentine's gift to you is a batch of brownies. To be honest, in my family, we rarely cooked the Brownies, having chowed down on the batter,* but there are people who do eat the fully-prepared treat. So where did Brownies come from? According to the February 12th issue of American Profile magazine, the chocolate convection was unveiled at the Women's Pavilion at the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago.

"Chicago socialite and philanthropist Bertha Palmer had asked the pastry chef at her husband's hotel, The Palmer House, to create a dessert that wasn't as messy as a cake or pastry and that could fit inside the box lunches for ladies at the fair... Fondness for the delicious dessert spread, and in 1896, Fannie Farmer published the first brownie recipe in her Boston Cooking School Cook Book... The original recipe developed at the Palmer House was handed down, chef to chef, and the hotel continues to serve a variation of that first Brownie."

In addition to the Brownie, neon lights, an early zipper, Juicy Fruit gum, and Shredded Wheat all made their debuts at the exposition, but none of them come close to the perfection of the Brownie. Enjoy!

Please tell me if you ever eat cookie dough or raw Brownie batter? Be honest. Candy and I do. :)

*Warning: It's not a good idea to eat raw eggs, but the Simonsens live dangerously.

11 comments:

  1. We enjoy eating brownie batter and cookie dough, too! It's the best! Happy Valentine's Day to you, Mary!

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  2. Well, that's a big, fat YES! In fact, we usually have a bowl of chocolate chip cookie batter in the fridge where Sam takes spoonfuls, or in "logs" in the freezer where we eat it frozen or in our ice cream. I prefer raw brownie batter. Now I think I might just have to go make some brownies!
    What a fun post! I never would have thought Juicy Fruit was that old.

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  3. Oh, and my favorite line, "Warning: It's not a good idea to eat raw eggs, but the Simonsens live dangerously." :)

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  4. You bet I do! My favorite is dough from my grandmother's sugar cookie recipe.

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  5. I'm obviously not alone in eating raw batter. Thanks for chiming in. :)

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  6. Gee shucks mary!!! I've come over all red in the face.

    have a great Valentines.

    Can I ask a personal question? What colour roses did your husband get you?

    I have just recently learnt the meaning of various colours to my detriment. Ha! Ha!

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  7. Hi Mary. Raw dough from my grandmother's oatmeal chocolate chip cookie recipe is divine. I've never tried brownie batter. Do you use the Fanny Farmer recipe?

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  8. Tony, If my husband bought me roses, they would be yellow. Honestly, we don't do anything on Valentine's Day. All our energies go into our anniversary in June.

    Jenny, I use Betty Crocker. I didn't know about Fanny Farmer's recipe until I read the article.

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  9. Yellow. That's what I bought Marilyn.

    Your husband and I will have to have a chat about this.

    What, not even a box of chocolates??? I would never have survived!!!!Ha! Ha!

    Maybe it's different in the States than it is here?
    All the best,
    Tony

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  10. I do indeed eat the batter of most baked things. I recently came across a one serving chocolate cake recipe and the batter for that is not only delicious, but does not contain eggs!

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